Monday, April 16, 2018

N = Nobody Likes to Waste Money

Welcome, A to Z bloggers, visitors, and of course all my faithful regular readers! This year's theme for my A to Z:
Short & Sweet Reasons Why You Need an Editor

So without further ado . . .

Nobody likes to waste their hard-earned money. Not even people who inherited theirs and didn't actually earn it.

When the average person spends their dollars, they expect to receive a quality product in return. If the product is shoddy, we call the company. We write an email to describe what's defective/broken/poorly made, or attach a photo of the garbage product. We usually attempt to return it.

But books are different. In most cases, we are stuck with what we've purchased, even if it stinks. Don't get me wrong: if you bought a book you just didn't end up liking, it's not the author's fault. But if you bought a book that was poorly written, there's not much you can do about it other than leave a negative review.

And if the book is that bad, there's zero chance the reader will waste any additional money on another book by that same author.

Don't be that author. People will only waste their money once, and then . . . well, you're essentially dead to them. True story.

15 comments:

  1. Yeah, money's one thing I'm scared about. How much will it be to find an editor, to possibly self-publish. Just more things to trigger my anxiety:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I won't say money isn't a factor, but most editors will work with you to find a price that's workable (if you have only x amount of dollars, they'll do x amount of work) and just about all of them offer payment plans. You can look at my pricing page to see the base rate for what I do, and multiply it by your word count to see how much you should plan to set aside. I'm probably mid to low on my pricing, but you should always comparison shop so you know you're getting the best services for your money. Low pricing may mean low quality, or it may mean you've found a gem for a good deal. Cover prices can vary, but if you shop early, you'll be prepared for a price range. I think most publishing anxiety can be lessened by looking ahead. And ask around! People love to recommend an editor or designer they've worked well with.

      Delete
  2. Sadly one book can kill an author's career.
    I know some people return eBooks, but I think that's rude. If I read the sample and purchased it anyway, that's on me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's true; all it takes is one. I've never returned a book and would assume it's my own fault if I didn't check first.

      Delete
  3. Hi Lynda - yes ... we know usually there's not much we can do about a book we don't enjoy - we can give it to charity and move on. We do that about things - so sometimes why not about books ...

    But I agree with Alex ... tough ... it's probably not worth worrying about - and really it's our responsibility to either decided to buy or not - our decision ...

    Cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep, charity is where my "nope" books go, unless they're so horrible that I don't want anyone else to have to read them. I can only think of two books I've thrown away, ever.

      Delete
  4. I wonder why people don't at the very least invest in the serious editing of the Look Inside sample - though I'm often glad they didn't!

    One look at the first page is often all it takes.

    But if the story is good, and the sample relatively flawless, the reader may be hooked enough to finish.

    Though there is always damning with faint praise: "The book was good after I got started - but there were too many typos."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Forgot to mention that I made a change to the appearance of the Table of Contents of the print version, approved it April 5th, and was told it might take three weeks before the Look Inside is correct. Be forewarned. So irritating to have to wait that long when the ebook can be updated in 24-48 hours!

      Delete
    2. A complaint among readers and editors alike is that some authors put their efforts only into the first few chapters, figuring the story will hook the reader enough to keep them through the rest of the less-polished stuff.

      This becomes a problem if they're scouting an editor, because the initial evaluation and cost estimate isn't based on a fair representation of the quality. Many editors (myself included) will ask for the full MS so we can grab a random portion from anywhere near the middle to do our eval.

      I hope your Table of Contents doesn't take too long! Often those estimates are worst-case scenarios, and the actual process is much quicker.

      Delete
  5. So true, and more true than ever. There are so many choices out there, so why choose a book by an author who has disappointed you in the past? You're on N! Huge applause from the gallery.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am on N already! I could hardly believe it when I looked at the calendar today. I'd forgotten how exhausting but exhilarating the month can be.

      As for the "don't waste money" advice, the opposite is true: I am more likely to look for more books by authors I've already enjoyed before seeking out new people, and will gladly spend money on people I like to support.

      Delete
  6. Having always toyed with the idea of writing a book, I have enjoyed your insights this A-to-Z challenge. Here's a Liebster to show my appreciation!
    https://truenorthbricks.com/2018/04/16/liebster-award-a-to-z-edition/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Tom! I'm enjoying your A to Z immensely.

      And hey, if you ever do get around to writing a book, I'd love to help you give it the perfect polish.

      I'll grab my Liebster questions and get them together to post as a grand finale for my A to Z!

      Delete
  7. Yep, it's kind of a variation on the old "Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me." Why buy a product from someone who disappointed you the first time?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't understand why otherwise-rational people—who would stop buying from a company that produces inferior products—don't see the connection to putting out a badly written book and having people not return for more.

      Delete

I love comments, and will always answer them, partly because I like having the last word and partly because I just like getting to know the people who read my blog. (Note: if the post is more than a couple weeks old, your comment will automatically go into the "needs approval" folder, but I will still publish it and reply!)